1887

Abstract

The relationship of isolates that were cultured from human clinical specimens in Australia to isolates from human clinical specimens in the USA and to species of the genus that are associated symbiotically with entomopathogenic nematodes was evaluated. A polyphasic approach that involved DNA–DNA hybridization, phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and gene sequences and phenotypic characterization was adopted. These investigations showed that gene sequence data correlated well with DNA–DNA hybridization and phenotypic data, but that 16S rRNA gene sequence data were not suitable for defining species within the genus . Australian clinical isolates proved to be related most closely to clinical isolates from the USA, but the two groups were distinct. A novel subspecies, subsp. subsp. nov. (type strain, 9802892=CIP 108025=ACM 5210), is proposed, with the concomitant creation of subsp. subsp. nov. Analysis of sequences, coupled with previously published data on DNA–DNA hybridization and PCR-RFLP analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, indicated that there are more than the three subspecies of that have been described and confirmed the validity of the previously proposed subdivision of . Although a non-luminescent, symbiotic isolate clustered consistently with in phylogenetic analyses, DNA–DNA hybridization indicated that this isolate does not belong to the species and that there is a clear distinction between symbiotic and clinical species of .

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2004-07-01
2019-10-15
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