1887

Abstract

A novel obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, organotrophic bacterium, strain ik275mar, was isolated from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Cells were rods surrounded by a sheath-like structure (toga), 0.4–0.9 µm in width and 1.2–6.0 µm in length. Strain ik275mar grew at 37–75 °C, pH 5.6–8.2 and at NaCl concentrations of 10–55 g l. Under optimum conditions (70 °C, pH 6.6, NaCl 20 g l), doubling time was 32 min. The isolate was able to ferment carbohydrates including starch, cellulose and cellulose derivatives. Acetate, H and CO were the main products of glucose fermentation. G+C content of DNA was 27 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain ik275mar is a member of the genus . 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with the other species of the genus ranged from 93.7 to 94.5 %. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and physiological properties of the novel isolate, we propose a novel species, sp. nov., with type strain ik275mar ( = DSM 23112  = VKM B-2574).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • , Federal Agency of Education , (Award П2283)
  • , Programs of Russian Academy of Sciences ‘Molecular and Cell biology’
  • , Origin and Evolution of Biosphere’
  • , US National Science Foundation , (Award NSF BIO-OCE 0728391)
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2011-05-01
2020-10-27
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