1887

Abstract

A Gram-staining-negative, catalase-positive, carbaryl-degrading, non-spore-forming, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain X23, was isolated from a wastewater treatment system. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain belongs to the genus . The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity observed for the isolate was 96.6 % with the type strain of . Chemotaxonomic data [major ubiquinone: Q-10; major polar lipids: diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, sphingoglycolipid, phosphatidylethanolamine and unknown aminolipids and phospholipids; major fatty acids: summed feature 7 (C 7, C 9 and/or C 12), C 5, C 2-OH and C 2-OH] as well as the inability to reduce nitrate and the presence of spermidine as the major polyamine supported the affiliation of the strain to the genus . Based on the phylogenetic analysis, whole-cell fatty acid composition and biochemical characteristics, the strain could be separated from all recognized species of the genus . Strain X23 should be classified as a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with strain X23 (=CCTCC AB 208221 =DSM 21541) as the type strain.

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2010-12-01
2019-12-13
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Comparison of the cellular fatty acid contents of strain X23 and other members of the genus . [ PDF] 70 KB

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Transmission electron micrograph of a negatively stained cell of strain X23 . Bar, 0.5µm.

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Total polar lipid profiles strain X23 (a) and reference strain YT (b) after two dimensional thin layer chromatography and detection with molybdophosphoric acid reagent. DPG, diphosphatidylglycerol; PG, phosphatidylglycerol; PE, phosphatidylethanolamine; PC, phosphatidylcholine; SGL, sphingoglycolipid; AL, unknown aminolipid; PL, unknown phospholipid.

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