1887

Abstract

Three yeast strains, 1AD8, 3AD15 and 3AD23, belonging to a previously unknown yeast species were isolated from two independent batches of the Spanish blue-veined Cabrales cheese, a traditional cheese manufactured without the addition of starter and mould cultures. Physiological characterization revealed that the unknown yeast is not fermentative and does not assimilate lactose; rather it assimilates -lactic acid and ethanol, major end products of lactic acid bacteria metabolism in cheese. The novel yeast is anamorphic. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction based on nucleotide sequence comparison of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene showed that and are the closest relatives of the unknown species. The name sp. nov. is proposed, and the isolate 1AD8 (=CECT 13027 =CBS 11679) is the type strain of this novel taxon.

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2010-11-01
2021-04-19
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