1887

Abstract

An obligate anaerobic, Gram-staining-negative, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, strain H1, was isolated from the rumen content of yak. Cells were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.8–1.0×3.0–4.0 μm in size, non-motile and encapsulated with mucous materials. Elliptical and terminal spores that swelled the cells were produced occasionally. The strain grew at 25–45 °C (optimum, 38 °C) and pH 6.0–7.8 (optimum, pH 6.7). Cellulose, cellobiose, xylan, xylose and maltose were used as carbon and energy sources, but not glucose. Products from cellulose and cellobiose fermentation were formic acid, acetic acid, carbon dioxide and trace amounts of ethanol, lactic acid and succinic acid. The genomic DNA G+C content was 33.7±1.2 mol%. The predominant fatty acids were C (27.1 %), C (9.2 %) and iso-C (6.4%). Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain H1 was affiliated to the clostridial rRNA cluster XIVb and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to DSM 5427 (96.0 %). These two strains formed a distinct lineage of the family ‘’. Based on data from this polyphasic taxonomic study, a new genus, gen. nov., is proposed. sp. nov. is proposed for strain H1. The type strain of sp. nov. is strain H1 (=CGMCC 1.5065=JCM 14822). was reclassified in the new genus as comb. nov. (type strain RHM5=ATCC 49066=DSM 5427=NCIMB 11756).

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2010-04-01
2021-10-25
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