1887

Abstract

A thermophilic bacterium, designated strain CR11, was isolated from a filamentous sample collected from a terrestrial hot spring on the south-western foothills of the Rincón volcano in Costa Rica. The Gram-negative cells are approximately 2.4–3.9 μm long and 0.5–0.6 μm wide and are motile rods with polar flagella. Strain CR11 grows between 65 and 85 °C (optimum 75 °C, doubling time 4.5 h) and between pH 4.8 and 7.8 (optimum pH 5.9–6.5). The isolate grows chemolithotrophically with S, or H as the electron donor and with O (up to 16 %, v/v) as the sole electron acceptor. The isolate can grow on mannose, glucose, maltose, succinate, peptone, Casamino acids, starch, citrate and yeast extract in the presence of oxygen (4 %) and S. Growth occurs only at NaCl concentrations below 0.4 % (w/v). The G+C content of strain CR11 is 40.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence places the strain as a close relative of OC 1/4 (95.7 % sequence similarity). Based on phylogenetic and physiological characteristics, we propose the name sp. nov., with CR11 (=DSM 19557 =ATCC BAA-1533) as the type strain.

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2010-02-01
2021-04-16
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