1887

Abstract

Two numerically important bacteria in marine pulp mill effluent enrichment cultures were isolated. These organisms were gram-negative, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic bacteria. Isolate IRE-31 (T = type strain) produced hydrolytic enzymes for the breakdown of cellulose, xylan, chitin, gelatin, and Tween 80. It also utilized a variety of monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino acids, and volatile fatty acids for growth. Isolate KW-40 did not utilize natural polymers, but it could grow on a variety of monosaccharides, disaccharides, alcohols, and amino acids. It also utilized methanol and aromatic compounds. The surfaces of both organisms were covered by blebs and vesicles. 16S rRNA analyses placed both organisms in the γ-3 subclass of the phylum . They were related to , and , although a close association with any of these bacteria was not found. The guanine-plus-cytosine contents of strain IRE-31 and KW-40 were 57.6 and 54.9 mol%, respectively. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence and phenotypic characterizations, these isolates were different enough so that they could be considered members of new genera. Thus, the following two new genera and species are proposed: , with type strain IRE-31 (= ATCC 700072), and , with type strain KW-40 (= ATCC 700074).

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1997-01-01
2022-08-18
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