1887

Abstract

Abstract

Over a 5-year period, six isolates of a previously unknown nonlipophilic coryneform bacterium were isolated from human clinical specimens. The most characteristic phenotypic reactions of these isolates included slow fermentative acid production from glucose but no acid production from maltose and sucrose and a strongly positive CAMP reaction. Chemotaxonomic investigations revealed that -diaminopimelic acid and mycolic acids were present, that palmitic, oleic, and stearic acids were the predominant cellular fatty acids, and that the G+C content was 62 to 64 mol%, characteristics which are consistent with assignment to the genus Phenotypically, the unknown coryneform bacterium could be readily differentiated from all other species. A 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and quantitative DNA-DNA hybridization experiments demonstrated unambiguously that the unknown coryneform bacterium is a member of the genus and is genotypically distinct from all other members of this genus. Based on phenotypic and genorypic findings, a new species, sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain of is strain DSM 44184 (= CCUG 35014).

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1997-01-01
2024-07-24
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