1887

Abstract

An acetone-degrading, nitrate-reducing, coccoid to rod-shaped bacterium, strain L1, was isolated from soil on the site of a natural gas company. Cells of the logarithmic growth phase reacted gram positive, while those of the stationary growth phase were gram negative. Single organisms were 0.4 to 0.5 by 0.9 to 1.5 μm in size, nonmotile, and non-spore forming and had poly-β-hydroxybutyrate inclusions. The doubling time of strain L1 on acetone-CO-nitrate at the optimal pH of 7 to 8 and the optimal temperature of 30 to 37°C was 12 h. More than 0.2% NaCl or 10 mM thiosulfate inhibited growth. For oxygen or nitrate respiration, acetone and a few organic chemicals were utilized as carbon sources whereas many others could not be used (for details, see Results). Bicarbonate (or CO) was essential for growth on acetone but not for growth on acetoacetate. The growth yields for acetone-CO and acetoacetate were 28.3 and 27.3 g/mol, respectively. With acetone as the carbon source, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate accounted for up to 40% of the cellular dry weight The DNA of strain L1 had a G+C content of 68.5 mol% (as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography of nucleotides) or 70 mol% (as determined by the T method). The sequence of the gene coding for the 16S rRNA led to the classification of strain L1 in the paracoccus group of the alpha subclass of the . The new isolate is named sp. nov. DSM 6637.

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1996-10-01
2024-02-22
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