1887

Abstract

A thermoacidophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic, aerobic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, strain 3H-1(T = type strain), was isolated from a solfataric field in Tsumagoi, Japan. This strain is a gram-negative, motile, non-spore-forming rod-shaped organism that requires elemental sulfur for growth by hydrogen oxidation. Type , and cytochromes are present. Carbon dioxide may be fixed via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. The optimum temperature for growth is 65°C. The optimum pH for growth is 3.0 to 4.0. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of DNA is 35.0 mol%. A straight-chain saturated Cacid and straight-chain unsaturated Cand Cacids are the major components of the cellular fatty acids. 2-Methylthio-3-VI, VII-tetrahydromultiprenyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (methionaquinone) is the major isoprenoid quinone. This strain is considered a member of a new species of the genus , a genus of obligately chemolithoautotrophic, aerobic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. The name sp. nov. is proposed for the organism. The type strain of this species is strain 3H-1 (= JCM 8795).

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1993-10-01
2022-12-09
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