1887

Abstract

A new cellulolytic, thermophilic species of the genus isolated from camel feces, compost, soil, and a hot spring is described. The cells are strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, endospore-forming rods that are 0.4 to 0.7 μm wide and 2.0 to 8.0 μm long. The optimum growth temperature is about 60°C. Cellulose, cellobiose, and a wide variety of carbohydrates are fermented, and the major fermentation products are carbon dioxide, hydrogen, ethanol, and acetic, butyric, and lactic acids. Hydrogen sulfide also is produced. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid is 36.7 to 37.8 mol%. The name sp. nov. is proposed for this species; the type strain is strain JT3-3 (= IAM 13577).

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-38-3-279
1988-07-01
2023-01-27
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