1887

Abstract

A total of 28 strains, representing 10 species of and including strains belonging to most of the known serogroups of each species, were examined for location, content, and composition of cellular nonhydroxy, monohydroxy , and dihydroxy fatty acids. The nonhydroxy fatty acid profiles were in agreement with previously published values. All species contained 5 to 15 mol% (depending on species) monohydroxy fatty acid, the profile of each species being readily distinguishable from the profiles of the other species. Only two species, and , contained detectable levels of dihydroxy fatty acids, which comprised 1 to 5 mol% of the total fatty acids. The dihydroxy fatty acid profiles of these two species were significantly different. In all species, the nonhydroxy fatty acids were readily extractable by lipid solvents and were labile when subjected to mild alkaline methanolysis (lipid associated, ester linked), whereas the hydroxylated components were not extractable, were stable when subjected to alkaline methanolysis, and were labile when subjected to acid hydrolysis (bound, amide linked). The monohydroxy fatty acids were shown to be acids of the 3-hydroxy family. The dihydroxy fatty acids were shown to be members of the 2,3-dihydroxy family. The profiles of the hydroxylated fatty acids provide a powerful method for differentiating the species, particularly those species whose nonhydroxy fatty acid profiles are quite similar.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-34-3-321
1984-07-01
2024-07-23
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/34/3/ijs-34-3-321.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-34-3-321&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Brenner D. J., Steigerwalt A. G., Gorman G. W., Weaver R. E., Feeley J. C., Cordes L. G., Wilkinson H. W., Patton C., Thomason B. M., Sasseville K. R. L. 1980; Legionella bozemanii species nova and Legionella dumoffii species nova: classification of two additional species of Legionella associated with human pneumonia. Curr. Microbiol. 4:111–116
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Brenner D. J., Steigerwalt A. G., McDade J. E. 1979; Classification of the Legionnaire’s disease bacterium: Legionella pneumophila, genus novum, species nova, of the family Legionellaceae, familia nova. Ann. Intern. Med. 90:656–658
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Cherry W. B., Gorman G. W., Orrison L. H., Moss C. W., Steigerwalt A. G., Wilkinson H. W., Johnson S. E., McKinney R. M., Brenner D. J. 1982; Legionella jordanis: a new species of Legionella isolated from water and sewage. J. Clin. Microbiol. 15:290–297
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cordes L. G., Wilkinson H. W., Gorman G. W., Fikes B. J., Fraser D. W. 1979; Atypical Legionella-like organisms: fastidious water-associated bacteria pathogenic for man. Lancetii927–930
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Edelstein P. H., Brenner D. J., Moss C. W., Steigerwalt A. G., Francis E. M., George W. L. 1982; Legionella wadsworthii species nova: a cause of human pneumonia. Ann. Intern. Med 97:809–813
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Feeley J. C., Gibson R. J., Gorman G. W., Langford N. C., Rasheed J. K., Mackel D. C., Baine W. B. 1979; Charcoal-yeast extract agar: primary isolation medium for Legionella pneumophila. . J. Clin. Microbiol. 10:437–441
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Finnerty W. R., Makula R. A., Feeley J. C. 1979; Cellular lipids of the Legionnaire’s disease bacterium. Ann. Intern. Med. 90:631–634
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Hebert G. A., Moss C. W., McDougal L. K., Bozeman F. M., McKinney R. M., Brenner D. J. 1980; The Rickettsia-like organisms TATLOCK (1943) and HEBA (1959): bacteria phenotypically similar to but genetically distinct from Legionella pneumophila and the WIGA bacterium. Ann. Intern. Med. 92:45–52
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Hebert G. A., Steigerwalt A. G., Brenner D. J. 1980; Legionella micdadei species nova: classification of a third species of Legionella associated with human pneumonia. Curr. Microbiol. 3:255–257
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Lewallen K. R., McKinney R. M., Brenner D. J., Moss C. W., Dail D. H., Thomason B. M., Bright R. A. 1979; A newly identified bacterium phenotypically resembling, but genetically distinct from, Legionella pneumophila: an isolate in a case of pneumonia. Ann. Intern. Med. 91:831–834
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Mayberry W. R. 1980; Hydroxy fatty acids in Bacteroides species: D-(–)-3-hydroxy-15-methylhexadecanoate and its homologs. J. Bacteriol. 143:582–587
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Mayberry W. R. 1981; Dihydroxy and monohydroxy fatty acids in Legionella pneumophila. . J. Bacteriol. 147:373–381
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Mayberry W. R., Smith P. F., Langworthy T. A., Plackett P. 1973; Identification of the amide-linked fatty acids of Acholeplasma axanthum S743 as D-(–)-3-hydroxy hexadecanoate and its homologues. J. Bacteriol. 116:1091–1095
    [Google Scholar]
  14. McLafferty F. W. 1963; Mass spectral correlations. American Chemical Society; Washington, D.C:
    [Google Scholar]
  15. McLafferty F. W. 1966; Interpretation of mass spectra. W. A. Benjamin, Inc.; New York:
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Morris G. K., Steigerwalt A., Feeley J. C., Wong E. S., Martin W. T., Patton C. M., Brenner D. J. 1980; Legionella gormanii sp. nov. J. Clin. Microbiol. 12:718–721
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Moss C. W., Bibb W. F., Karr D. E., Guerrant G. O., Lambert M. A. 1983; Cellular fatty acid composition and ubiquinone content of Legionella feeleii sp. nov. J. Clin. Microbiol. 18:917–919
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Moss C. W., Dees S. B. 1979; Further studies of the cellular fatty acid composition of Legionnaire’s disease bacteria. J. Clin. Microbiol. 9:648–649
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Moss C. W., Dees S. B. 1979; Cellular fatty acid composition of WIGA, a Rickettsia-like agent similar to Legionnaire’s disease bacterium. J. Clin. Microbiol. 10:390–391
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Moss C. W., Karr D. E., Dees S. B. 1981; Cellular fatty acid composition of Legionella longbeachae sp. nov. J. Clin. Microbiol. 14:692–694
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Moss C. W., Lambert M. A., Merwin W. H. 1974; Comparison of rapid methods for analysis of bacterial fatty acids. Appl. Microbiol. 28:80–85
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Moss C. W, Weaver R. E., Dees S. B., Cherry W. B. 1977; Cellular fatty acid composition of isolates from Legionnaire’s disease. J. Clin. Microbiol. 6:140–143
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Orrison L. H., Cherry W. B., Tyndall R. L., Fliermans C. B., Gough S. B., Lambert M. A., McDougal L. K., Bibb W. F., Brenner D. J. 1983; Legionella oakridgensis: unusual new species isolated from cooling tower water. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 45:536–545
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Pasculle A. W., Feeley J. C., Gibson R. J., Cordes L. G., Meyerowitz R. L., Patton C. M., Gorman G. W., Carmack A. L., Ezzell J. W., Dowling J. N. 1980; Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: direct isolation from human lung tissue. J. Infect. Dis. 141:727–732
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Schrader S. R. 1971; Introductory mass spectrometry. AHyn and Bacon, Inc.; Boston:
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Vickers R. M., Brown A., Garrity G. M. 1981; Dye-containing buffered charcoal-yeast extract medium for differentiation of members of the family Legionellaceae. . J. Clin. Microbiol. 13:380–382
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-34-3-321
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-34-3-321
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error