1887

Abstract

When grown in high salt concentrations, halophilic bacteria often accumulate compatible solutes, which have major applications in biotechnology because they stabilize cells and proteins. Four Gram-negative bacterial strains, belonging to the family were isolated from Qaberoun and Um-Alma lakes in South Libya using high-salinity medium. The strains were identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing as belonging to (strain ABQ1) (ABQ2), (ABU1) and (ABU2). ABQ1 is a moderate halophile (salinity range 0.05 to 2.5 M NaCl), with a broad tolerance to pH (7 to 9) and temperature (25–37 °C). Addition of the compatible solutes glycine betaine (betaine) and ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidine carboxylic acid) to the medium had a positive effect on growth of at 2 M NaCl. In rich LB medium, betaine was the major compatible solute accumulated, with ectoine only being accumulated at salinities in excess of 1 M NaCl. In minimal M9 medium, betaine was not produced, but increasing amounts of ectoine were synthesized with increasing salinity, and hydroxyectoine [(4S,5S)−5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid] was also synthesized when the cells were grown in very high salt. We have thus identified as a producer of ectoine and hydroxyectoine, with more being produced at higher salinities. As industrial demand for these compatible solutes continues to increase, this system has biotechnological potential.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-05-11
2022-05-24
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