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Abstract

Human norovirus (HuNoV) is a highly contagious pathogenic virus that is transmitted through contaminated food, water, high-touch surfaces and aerosols. Globally, there are an estimated 685 million infections annually due to norovirus, including 200 million affecting children under the age of 5. HuNoV causes approximately 50, 000 child deaths per year and costs an estimated USD $60 billion annually in healthcare. This study sought to determine the inactivation profile of ultraviolet subtype C (UVC) against norovirus using a UVC light-emitting diode (LED) array, KL265-50V-SM-WD. The array emitted radiation at 269 nm peak wavelength and a measured fluence of 1.25 mW cm at a 7 cm source–surface distance. Since the HuNoV is not cultivable, the study utilized feline calicivirus (FCV) ATCC VR-782, a recommended surrogate as challenge organism. The test followed modified ASTM E2197. Assessment of virus inactivation was performed using a plaque assay method. With irradiance at a UVC dose of 22.5 mJ cm, the study obtained 99.9 % virus reduction (3 log reduction). The results demonstrate that the UVC LED array can provide effective inactivation of HuNoV.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2022-01-12
2022-01-17
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