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Abstract

subspecies serovar Corvallis (. Corvallis) has been identified as a human pathogen and as a food contaminant. Diarrhoeal disease is a common diagnosis in tourists visiting Southeast Asia, often with unknown aetiology. However, numerous public health institutes have identified as a common causative agent when consuming contaminated food and water. Genomic data from environmental isolates from a Cambodian informal market were uploaded to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) platform, allowing the novel sequences to be compared to global whole-genome sequence archives. The comparison revealed that two human clinical isolates from England and four of the environmental isolates were closely related, with an average single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) difference of 1 (0–3 SNPs). A maximum-likelihood tree based on core SNPs was generated comparing the 4 isolates recovered from a Cambodian informal market with 239 isolates of . Corvallis received from routine surveillance of human salmonellosis in England and confirmed the close relationship. In addition, the environmental isolates clustered into a broader phylogenetic group within the . Corvallis population containing 68 additional human isolates, of which 42 were from patients who reported recent international travel, almost exclusively to Southeast Asia. The environmental isolates of . Corvallis isolated from an informal market in Cambodia are concerning for public health due to their genetic similarity to isolates (e.g. clinical isolates from the UK) with known human virulence and pathogenicity. This study emphasizes the benefits of global and public data sharing of pathogen genomes.

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2022-01-12
2022-01-28
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