1887

Abstract

Vaccines are a recommended strategy for controlling influenza A infections in humans and animals. Here, we describe the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the structure, morphology and functional characteristics of avian influenza A H3N8 virus. The effect of hydrostatic pressure for 3 h on H3N8 virus revealed that the particles were resistant to this condition, and the virus displayed only a discrete conformational change. We found that pressure of 3 kbar applied for 6 h was able to inhibit haemagglutination and infectivity while virus replication was no longer observed, suggesting that full virus inactivation occurred at this point. However, the neuraminidase activity was not affected at this approach suggesting the maintenance of neutralizing antibody epitopes in this key antigen. Our data bring important information for the area of structural virology of enveloped particles and support the idea of applying pressure-induced inactivation as a tool for vaccine production.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • PRONEX
    • Principle Award Recipient: ShanaPriscila coutinho Barroso
  • INBEB
    • Principle Award Recipient: ShanaPriscila coutinho Barroso
  • IMBEBB
    • Principle Award Recipient: ShanaPriscila coutinho Barroso
  • FAPERJ
    • Principle Award Recipient: ShanaPriscila coutinho Barroso
  • CAPES
    • Principle Award Recipient: ShanaPriscila coutinho Barroso
  • CNPq
    • Principle Award Recipient: ShanaPriscila coutinho Barroso
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2021-04-13
2021-05-15
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