1887

Abstract

Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are thought to play a role in small intestine immunological maturation. Studies in weanling mice have shown a positive correlation between ileal SFB abundance and plasma and faecal interleukin 17 (IL-17) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentrations. Although the first observation of SFB presence was reported in rats, most studies use mice. The size of the mouse ileum is a limitation whereas the rat could be a suitable alternative for sufficient samples. Changes in SFB abundance over time in rats were hypothesized to follow the pattern reported in mice and infants. We characterized the profile of SFB colonization in the ileum tissue and contents and its correlation with two immune markers of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) maturation. We also compared two published ileum collection techniques to determine which yields data on SFB abundance with least variability. Whole ileal tissue and ileal mucosal scrapings were collected from 20- to 32-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. SFB abundance was quantified from proximal, middle and distal ileal tissues, contents and faeces by quantitative PCR using SFB-specific primers. Antibody-specific ELISAs were used to determine IL-17 and IgA concentrations. Significant differences in SFB abundance were observed from whole and scraped tissues peaking at day 22. Variability in whole ileum data was less, favouring it as a better collection technique. A similar pattern of SFB abundance was observed in ileum contents and faeces peaking at day 24, suggesting faeces can be a proxy for ileal SFB abundance. SFB abundance at day 26 was higher in females than males across all samples. There were significant differences in IgA concentration between days 20, 30 and 32 and none in IL-17 concentration, which was different from reports in mice and infants.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Tertiary Education Commission
    • Principle Award Recipient: LindaA Oemcke
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2021-03-23
2021-10-17
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