1887

Abstract

Both bacterial and aseptic meningitis can complicate neurosurgery, but they are often difficult to distinguish clinically or by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. We present an adolescent with subacute meningitis after neurosurgery, eventually diagnosed with meningitis caused by via 16S rRNA gene sequencing after two negative CSF cultures. He was treated successfully with intravenous meropenem with full recovery. This case shows that distinguishing bacterial from aseptic meningitis is important to allow directed antibiotic therapy. We recommend considering bacterial meningitis in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis complicating neurosurgery, and to perform molecular diagnostics such as bacterial sequencing if the suspicion of bacterial meningitis is high.

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2021-03-10
2021-04-19
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