1887

Abstract

Organisms possessing the gene (responsible for carbapenem resistance) with a class-1 integron can acquire many other antibiotic resistance genes from the community sewage pool and become multidrug-resistant superbugs. In this regard, hospital sewage, which contains a large quantity of residual antibiotics, metals and disinfectants, is being recognized as a significant cause of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) origination and spread across the major centres of the world and is thus routinely investigated as a marker for tracing the origin of drug resistance. Therefore, in this study, an attempt has been made to identify and characterize the carbapenem-resistant microbes associated with integron genes amongst the organisms isolated from the effluent treatment plant (ETP) installed in a tertiary respiratory care hospital in Delhi, India.

One hundred and thirty-eight organisms belonging to , , and spp. were collected from the incoming and outgoing sewage lines of the ETP. Carbapenem sensitivity and characterization was performed by the imipenem and imipenem-EDTA disc diffusion method. Later DNA extraction and PCR steps were performed for the Int-1 and genes.

Of the 138 organisms, 86 (62.3 %) were imipenem-resistant (<0.05). One hundred and twenty-four (89.9 %) organisms had one or both of the genes. Overall, the gene (genotypic resistance) was present in 71 % (98/138) of organisms. 53.6 % (74/138) organisms were double gene-positive ( + Int-1), of which 40 were producing the metallo-beta-lactamase enzyme, making up almost 28.9 % (40/138) of the collected organisms.

The current study strengthens the hypothesis that Carbapenem resistant organisms are in a high-circulation burden through the human gut and hospital ETPs are providing an environment for resistance origination and amplification.

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2020-04-01
2020-06-02
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