1887

Abstract

is one of the most important nosocomial pathogens; however, reports regarding its clinical and molecular characteristics from Japan are scarce.

We studied the multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-based epidemiology and virulence-associated genes of isolates and the clinical backgrounds of patients from whom the isolates had been recovered.

A total of 105 stool samples tested in a toxin enzyme immune assay (EIA) were analysed at the University of Tokyo Hospital from March 2013 to July 2014. PCR for MLST and the virulence-associated genes , , , and was performed on isolates meeting our inclusion criteria following retrospective review of medical records. EIA-positive and EIA-negative groups with toxigenic strains underwent clinical and molecular background comparison.

The toxigenic strains ST17, ST81, ST2, ST54, ST8, ST3, ST37 and ST53 and the non-toxigenic strains ST109, ST15 and ST100 were frequently recovered. The prevalence rate of -negative ST81 and ST37, endemic in China and Korea, was higher (11.4%) than that reported in North America and Europe, and hypervirulent ST1(RT027) and ST11(RT078) strains that occur in North America and Europe were not recovered. The linkage between the EIA results and A/B positivity, deletion, or variation was absent among toxigenic strains. Compared with the 38 EIA-negative cases, the 36 EIA-positive cases showed that the patients in EIA-positive cases were older and more frequently had chronic kidney disease, as well as a history of beta-lactam use and proton pump inhibitor therapy.

In Japan, the prevalence rates for -negative strains are high, whereas the -positive strains are rare. EIA positivity is linked to older age, chronic kidney disease and the use of beta-lactams and proton pump inhibitors.

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2019-12-19
2020-01-24
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