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Abstract

The mouse () has been extensively used for studying brucellosis, regarding pathogenesis, immunity and the evaluation of vaccines and therapeutics. In this work, RNA-seq was applied to explore the immunological potential of a live S19∆, a perosamine synthetase gene mutant of S19. Comparison of transcriptome data was carried out for identifying differentially expressed genes among PBS (control) and S19∆ immunized mice at 15 days post-immunization. Functional analysis revealed 545 significant differentially expressed genes related to mouse immunity. Specific activation of MHC-I and MHC-II antigen-processing pathways were identified as the highly enriched pathways based on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotation. Other major immune response pathways regulated within the host were NF-kappa B signalling, chemokine signalling, T-cell receptor pathway, apoptosis, TNF signalling and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor signalling. These data provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms of S19∆-induced immune response in mice spleen that might facilitate the development of a highly immunogenic vaccine against brucellosis.

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2019-12-02
2019-12-11
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