1887

Abstract

Isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from rice beer prepared in Assam, India was performed and their growth associated and functional properties were studied. LAB strains were identified as Lactobacillus casei , Pediococcus pentosaceus , Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus plantarum based on 16 s rRNA sequencing. Their growth characteristics at different pH, NaCl concentration, temperature and presence of carbohydrates were profiled. High tolerance against acid and bile salts was shown by all the strains, particularly L. pentosus TEZU174 and P. pentosaceus TEZU199 up to a pH of 1.5, and L. pentosus TEZU174 up to 14  % bile concentration. They were susceptible towards the common antibiotics, wherein erythromycin, chloramphenicol and linezolid were the most effective. The strains displayed antibiosis activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and antioxidant activity in terms of resistance to H2O2, scavenging of ·OH and DPPH free radicals was also displayed, wherein L. casei TEZU374 and P. pentosaceus TEZU482 were the most effective with above 70  % scavenging activity. The strains displayed cellular aggregation and L. casei TEZU262 and L. casei TEZU309 were highly aggregated, which attained 100  % autoaggregation within a period of 5 h. High cell surface hydrophobicity was shown by L. casei TEZU309 towards xylene and chloroform, and P. pentosaceus TEZU427 towards ethyl acetate. The strains evinced good gut tolerance capacity, antioxidant activity and adherence properties, which are characteristics of probiotic bacteria and thus are candidates for therapeutic uses and also to be used as starter cultures.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000028
2019-05-29
2019-08-26
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/acmi/1/4/acmi000028.html?itemId=/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000028&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Dung NTP, Rombouts FM, Nout MJR. Functionality of selected strains of moulds and yeasts from Vietnamese rice wine starters. Food Microbiol 2006;23:331–340 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Das AJ, Deka SC, Miyaji T. Methodology of rice beer preparation and various plant materials used in starter culture preparation by some tribal communities of north-east India: a survey. Int Food Res J 2012;19:101–107
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Kim JY, Kim D, Park P, Kang HI, Ryu EK et al. Effects of storage temperature and time on the biogenic amine content and microflora in Korean turbid rice wine, Makgeolli. Food Chemistry 2011;128:87–92 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Das AJ, Khawas P, Miyaji T, Deka SC. HPLC and GC-MS analyses of organic acids, carbohydrates, amino acids and volatile aromatic compounds in some varieties of rice beer from Northeast India. J Inst Brew 2014;120:244–252 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Hager AS, Taylor JP, Waters DM, Arendt EK. Gluten free beer – A review. Trends Food Sci Technol 2014;36:44–54 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Jin J, Kim SY, Jin Q, Eom HJ, Han NS. Diversity analysis of lactic acid bacteria in Takju, Korean rice wine. J Microbiol Biotechnol 2008;18:1678–1682
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Das AJ, Khawas P, Miyaji T, Deka SC. Effect of various microbial starters for amylolytic fermentation on some quality attributes of rice beer. Int Food Res J 2014;21:2443–2450
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Chen S, Xu Y. The influence of yeast strains on the volatile flavour compounds of Chinese rice wine. J Inst Brew 2010;116:190–196 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Lee CH. Lactic acid fermented foods and their benefits in Asia. Food Control 1997;8:259–269 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Stiles ME, Holzapfel WH. Lactic acid bacteria of foods and their current taxonomy. Int J Food Microbiol 1997;36:1–29 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Klein G, Pack A, Bonaparte C, Reuter G. Taxonomy and physiology of probiotic lactic acid bacteria. Int J Food Microbiol 1998;41:103–125 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Leroy F, De Vuyst L. Lactic acid bacteria as functional starter cultures for the food fermentation industry. Trends Food Sci Technol 2004;15:67–78 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Gilliland SE. Health and nutritional benefits from lactic acid bacteria. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1990;7:175–188 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Tannock GW. Medical Importance of the Normal Microflora Boston, MA: Springer; 1999
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Heller KJ. Probiotic bacteria in fermented foods: product characteristics and starter organisms. Am J Clin Nutr 2001;73:374s–379s [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Brown AE. Benson`s Microbiological Applications: Laboratory Manual in General Microbiology New York: McGraw Hill; 2005
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Kumar S, Stecher G, Tamura K. mega7: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 7.0 for bigger datasets. Mol Biol Evol 2016;33:1870–1874 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Tamura K, Nei M. Estimation of the number of nucleotide substitutions in the control region of mitochondrial DNA in humans and chimpanzees. Mol Biol Evol 1993;10:512–526 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Briges M. The classification of lactobacilli by means of physiological tests. Microbiology 1953;9:234–248
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Pilone GJ, Clayton MG, van Duivenboden RJ. Characterization of wine lactic acid bacteria: single broth culture for tests of heterofermentation, mannitol from fructose, and ammonia from arginine. Am J Enol Vitic 1991;42:153–157
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Harrigan WF, McCance ME. Laboratory Methods in Food and Dairy Microbiology London: Academic Press; 1990
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Gerhardt P, Murray RGE, Costilow RN, Nester EW, Wood WA et al. Manual of Methods for General Bacteriology Washington: American Society for Microbiology; 1981
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Hesseltine CW, Ray ML. Lactic acid bacteria in murcha and ragi. J Appl Bacteriol 1988;64:395–401 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Jacobsen CN, Rosenfeldt Nielsen V, Hayford AE, Møller PL, Michaelsen KF et al. Screening of probiotic activities of forty-seven strains of Lactobacillus spp. by in vitro techniques and evaluation of the colonization ability of five selected strains in humans. Appl Environ Microbiol 1999;65:4949–4956
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Klayraung S, Viernstein H, Sirithunyalug J, Okonogi S. Probiotic properties of lactobacilli isolated from Thai traditional food. Sci Pharm 2008;76:485–503 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Schillinger U, Lücke FK. Antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus sake isolated from meat. Appl Environ Microbiol 1989;55:1901–1906
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Muhialdin BJ, Hassan Z. Screening of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Antifungal Activity against Aspergillus oryzae. Am J Appl Sci 2011;8:447–451 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Li S, Zhao Y, Zhang L, Zhang X, Huang L et al. Antioxidant activity of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Food Chem 2012;135:1914–1919 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Del Re B, Sgorbati B, Miglioli M, Palenzona D. Adhesion, autoaggregation and hydrophobicity of 13 strains of Bifidobacterium longum. Lett Appl Microbiol 2000;31:438–442 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Rosenberg M, Gutnick D, Rosenberg E. Adherence of bacteria to hydrocarbons: a simple method for measuring cell-surface hydrophobicity. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1980;9:29–33 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Bellon-Fontaine MN, Rault J, Van Oss CJ. Microbial adhesion to solvents: a novel method to determine the electron-donor/electron-acceptor or Lewis acid-base properties of microbial cells. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 1996;7:47–53 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  32. CLSI Methods for Antimicrobial Dilution and Disk Susceptibility testing of Infrequently Isolated or Fastidious Bacteria, 3rd ed. USA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2016
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Douillard FP, Kant R, Ritari J, Paulin L, Palva A et al. Comparative genome analysis of Lactobacillus casei strains isolated from Actimel and Yakult products reveals marked similarities and points to a common origin. Microbial Biotechnology 2013;6:576–587 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Bertazzoni Minelli E, Benini A, Marzotto M, Sbarbati A, Ruzzenente O et al. Assessment of novel probiotic Lactobacillus casei strains for the production of functional dairy foods. Int Dairy J 2004;14:723–736 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Mishra V, Prasad DN. Application of in vitro methods for selection of Lactobacillus casei strains as potential probiotics. Int J Food Microbiol 2005;103:109–115 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Anonymous EFSA panel on additives and products or substances used in animal feed (FEEDAP). Scientific opinion on the safety and efficacy of Lactobacillus pentosus (DSM 14025) as a silage additive for all animal species. EFSA J 2011;9:2449
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Buyondo JP, Liu SJ. Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus pentosus from wood extract hydrolysates. J-FOR 2011;4:38–47
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Zheng PX, Fang HY, Yang HB, Tien NY, Wang MC et al. Lactobacillus pentosus strain LPS16 produces lactic acid, inhibiting multidrug-resistant Helicobacter pylori. J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2016;49:168–174 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Kaushik JK, Kumar A, Duary RK, Mohanty AK, Grover S et al. Functional and probiotic attributes of an indigenous isolate of Lactobacillus plantarum. PLoS One 2009;4:e8099 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Huang R, Tao X, Wan C, Li S, Xu H et al. In vitro probiotic characteristics of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 and its modulatory effect on gut microbiota of mice. J Dairy Sci 2015;98:5850–5861 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Nghe D, Nguyen T. Characterization of antimicrobial activities of Pediococcus pentosaceus Vtcc-B-601. J Appl Pharm Sci 2014;4:61–64
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Mora D, Fortina MG, Parini C, Manachini PL. Identification of Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus based on 16S rRNA and ldhD gene-targeted multiplex PCR analysis. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1997;151:231–236 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Liu S, Pritchard GG, Hardman MJ, Pilone GJ. Occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes in arginine catabolism by wine lactic acid bacteria. Appl Environ Microbiol 1995;61:310–316
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Ammor MS, Mayo B. Selection criteria for lactic acid bacteria to be used as functional starter cultures in dry sausage production: an update. Meat Sci 2007;76:138–146 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Argyri AA, Zoumpopoulou G, Karatzas KAG, Tsakalidou E, Nychas GJE et al. Selection of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria from fermented olives by in vitro tests. Food Microbiol 2013;33:282–291 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Beales N. Adaptation of microorganisms to cold temperatures, weak acid preservatives, low pH, and osmotic stress: a review. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf 2004;3:1–20 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Georgieva R, Yocheva L, Tserovska L, Zhelezova G, Stefanova N et al. Antimicrobial activity and antibiotic susceptibility of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. intended for use as starter and probiotic cultures. Biotechnol Biotechnol Equip 2015;29:84–91 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Abriouel H, Casado Muñoz MDC, Lavilla Lerma L, Pérez Montoro B, Bockelmann W et al. New insights in antibiotic resistance of Lactobacillus species from fermented foods. Food Res Int 2015;78:465–481 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Guo H, Pan L, Li L, Lu J, Kwok L et al. Characterization of antibiotic resistance genes from Lactobacillus isolated from traditional dairy products. J Food Sci 2017;3:724–730
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Saarela M, Mogensen G, Fondén R, Mättö J, Mattila-Sandholm T. Probiotic bacteria: safety, functional and technological properties. J Biotechnol 2000;84:197–215 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Ljungh A, Wadström T. Lactic acid bacteria as probiotics. Curr Issues Intest Microbiol 2006;7:73–90
    [Google Scholar]
  52. Amaretti A, Di Nunzio M, Pompei A, Raimondi S, Rossi M et al. Antioxidant properties of potentially probiotic bacteria: in vitro and in vivo activities. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2013;97:809–817 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Kullisaar T, Zilmer M, Mikelsaar M, Vihalemm T, Annuk H et al. Two antioxidative lactobacilli strains as promising probiotics. Int J Food Microbiol 2002;72:215–224 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Nikolic M, Jovcic B, Kojic M, Topisirovic L. Surface properties of Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc isolates from homemade cheeses showing auto-aggregation ability. Eur Food Res Technol 2010;231:925–931 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Collado MC, Meriluoto J, Salminen S. Adhesion and aggregation properties of probiotic and pathogen strains. Eur Food Res Technol 2008;226:1065–1073 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Samot J, Lebreton J, Badet C. Adherence capacities of oral lactobacilli for potential probiotic purposes. Anaerobe 2011;17:69–72 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  57. Schär-Zammaretti P, Ubbink J. The cell wall of lactic acid bacteria: surface constituents and macromolecular conformations. Biophys J 2003;85:4076–4092 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000028
Loading
/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000028
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error