1887

Abstract

Dermatophytosis caused by formerly is rare in occurrence due to its geophilic adaptation and weak pathogenic potential in establishing infection in humans. The taxonomical status of has been controversial over the years and has now reached a concordance among mycologists. Innumerable reports of causing widespread infection in human immunodeficiency virus patients trails them as an important agent of consideration in an immunocompromised host. There have been sporadic reports of causing glabrous skin tinea and onychomycosis in healthy patients and the prevalence reports gravitate around 1–6.5  %. A variety of non-anthropophilic dermatophytes including novel species have now been implicated in causing dermatophytosis reflecting the era of crux changes in the epidemiology.

We present a case of chronic dermatophytosis in a 22-year-old healthy Indian with a history of contact with a dog and soil and other factors favouring dermatophytosis. Conventional and molecular sequencing established the isolate as . Antifungal susceptibility test revealed a higher MIC of griseofulvin and lower MIC to azoles and terbinafine. The patient had complete clinical resolution following administration of oral terbinafine.

Amidst the hyper-endemic-like scenario of tinea in India, this case report stands as a unique example of a patient infected with showing complete clinical resolution using terbinafine. Studies implicating in an immunocompetent host are rare and there is a need for more studies on geophilic dermatophytes causing tinea in the man for laying down effective preventive measures.

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2019-08-01
2019-09-22
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